AMIA webinar w Dr Dom Furniss from @UCLIC on medical device design & distributed cognition

Edited 10 March 2015
UK time updated to reflect Daylight Savings Time

Dom Furniss, from the UCL Interaction Centre who works on both the CHI+MED and Eclipse projects, will be giving a webinar on 12 March 2015 at 1pm-2.30pm EST (5pm-6.30pm GMT for those in the UK).

Exploring medical device design and use through layers of Distributed Cognition: How a glucometer is coupled with its context

Presenter Dominic Furniss, PhD – UCL Interaction Centre, University College London
Thursday 12 March 2015 1:00PM – 2:30PM EST [5pm-6.30pm UK time]
Fee: Member – Free, Non-member: $50
Event websiteRegister Now

There’ll be a ~50m presentation from Dom followed by a ~30m Q&A and it’s aimed at people interested in interactive medical devices and understanding their design and use in context (audience: HCI, human factors, informatics, medical / healthcare professionals who use medical devices).

Learning Objectives After viewing this webinar, the learner should be better able to:

  • Understand the perspective of ‘the medical device reaching out’ through layers of sociotechnical system, becoming interconnected with distant systems and influenced by dispersed groups
  • Explain Distributed Cognition, its applicability to informatics, and making it more accessible to researchers and practitioners
  • Understand DiCoT-CL: a framework to facilitate the application of Distributed Cognition to explore medical device design and use in context

Further reading Dominic Furniss, Paolo Masci, Paul Curzon, Astrid Mayer and Ann Blandford Exploring medical device design and use through layers of Distributed Cognition: How a glucometer is coupled with its context, Journal of Biomedical Informatics [in press] – until 24 April 2015 you can access the full article FREE.

Abstract Medical devices are becoming more interconnected and complex, and are increasingly supported by fragmented organizational systems, e.g. through different processes, committees, supporting staff and training regimes. Distributed Cognition has been proposed as a framework for understanding the design and use of medical devices. However, it is not clear that it has the analytic apparatus to support the investigation of such complexities. This paper proposes a framework that introduces concentric layers to DiCoT, a method that facilitates the application of Distributed Cognition theory. We use this to explore how an inpatient blood glucose meter is coupled with its context. The analysis is based on an observational study of clinicians using a newly introduced glucometer on an oncology ward over approximately 150 h (11 days and 4 nights). Using the framework we describe the basic mechanics of the system, incremental design considerations, and larger design considerations. The DiCoT concentric layers (DiCoT-CL) framework shows promise for analyzing the design and use of medical devices, and how they are coupled with their context.

We have other Publications on this topic (search in-page for distributed cognition or DiCoT) UK-based people might also be interested in

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This entry was posted in CHI+MED, CHI+MED people, CHI+MED research, courses and webinars, Events, health / medical, Human Factors, interaction design, medical devices and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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